Thursday, July 23, 2020

Tips to Help Your Stressed Out College Kid Cope

Tips to Help Your Stressed Out College Kid Cope Stress Management Situational Stress Print 6 Tips to Help Your Stressed Out College Kid By Jackie Burrell Jackie Burrell is a former education and parenting reporter, experienced in issues around parenting young adults as a mother of four. Learn about our editorial policy Jackie Burrell Updated on February 03, 2020 How Stress Impacts Your Health Overview Signs of Burnout Stress and Weight Gain Benefits of Exercise Stress Reduction Tips Self-Care Practices Mindful Living As parents of young adults, we’re all too familiar with stress, but our kids suffer from it too. Stress rates among teens and young adults have spiked in recent years and its no wonder. Junior and senior year of high school and the lead-up to college applications are prime time for stress overload. So are the first few weeks of college, the weeks of midterms and lead-up to final exams. There may be a day or two of stresslessness in there somewhere, but who can tell? When that late night phone call comes from a child who’s freaking out, the last thing they want to hear is a lecture on the importance of doing your homework and planning ahead. Instead, heres a list of things you can advise that may offer immediate relief: Sleep Cutting back on sleep may seem like a good way to eke out a few more hours for exam cramming, but missing even a few hours of sleep two or more nights in a row can result in sleep deprivation. Concentration drops, memory function is impaired, and the brain turns foggy and sluggish â€" hardly the optimal conditions for studying. There’s a clear connection between the amount of sleep a student gets and his GPA, and studies have shown that morning owls perform better academically. So tell your frantic child to set the alarm for 7 a.m., plan on doing some hardcore â€" and vastly refreshed â€" studying then and get some sleep now. Make a List If thoughts are racing through your child’s brain with such velocity that he can’t sleep, tell him to make a list. We’d all love to have a Pensieve, the magical basin Hogwarts headmaster Albus Dumbledore used to hold memories and thoughts when they threatened to overwhelm his brain, but a to-do list works nearly as well. Eat Well Brains need nourishment. Eating a balanced diet that’s heavy in protein and complex carbohydrates, as opposed to donuts, beer, and someone else’s Ritalin, makes a huge difference in one’s body’s ability to cope with stress and perform well. Keep that in mind when sending your college child an exam week care package too. Prioritize Tell him to work on the most critical or difficult courses or projects first, when his brain is fresh. Too much work? Tell him to look at his schedule and eliminate the non-essentials. Remind him that the world will not stop if he tanks a test. Try a Study Group Studying with a group quells panic. It lets students play to their own strengths, and maximizes and organizes study time. Plus, the companionship helps soothe frayed nerves. Take Breaks Go for a run, take a nap â€" but no more than 20 to 30 minutes and no later than mid-afternoon. Make an exam worry doll and let it do the worrying.

Friday, May 22, 2020

The Critical Evaluation Essay - 1084 Words

Professor: Terry Hennessy ENG: 102 20 September 2013 The Cover Letter 1. What is your purpose in writing this essay? In your response, explore the deeper meaning of this question. The goal is not just to complete the assignment but instead to convey a message. What do you plan to accomplish with this essay? What do you hope the reader takes away from this argument? I believe the purpose in writing this essay was to give students the opportunity to evaluates someone’s work and to see if we can look pass our own opinions and decide whether the person writing the article was able to convey their argument in a way that was understandable. 2. What did you learn from completing this assignment? Did you experience a new†¦show more content†¦Murray uses logos to prove that women and men are the same when given the same opportunities to succeed. According to our reading, logos relies on sound logic to determine if a statement is true, as long as all the reasons â€Å"add up† to the conclusion (Driver, Gast, Lowman-Thomas). She hinted in her argument that women couldn’t provide a lot of contributions to society because they were raised to be homemakers and not out in the workforce since that was a mans place. She believed that women were denied the opportunities to make an impact on society because they were limited in their education and upbringing. All the information presented in her argument was valid and it shows that one cannot truly conclude who the superior sex is based on gender. Both sexes have the ability to be great and all it takes providing both gender with the opportunities they need to excel in life. Murray’s argument was very successful because it allows the reader to see what changes needed to be made in order to make the genders play on a leveled playing field and be completely equal. Although equality of the sexes is what most people want, it will never happen unless society removes the stigma placed on women, which make her nothing more than a simple housewife that just here to have babies and serve her man. The void that women felt back in the 1700s, is the same void some women feel today andShow MoreRelatedCritical Evaluation Essay1006 Words   |  5 PagesArrington 1 Karen Arrington English Katherine Oneil 22 July 2012 CRITICAL EVALUATION ESSAY Introduction In W.E.B. Du Bois’ â€Å"Of Mr. Booker T. Washington and Others,† Du Bois criticized Washington’s policy of racial accommodation and gradualism. Du Bois rejected the latter’s willingness to avoid messing with the racial issues andRead Morecritical evaluation Essay852 Words   |  4 Pages Professor English 102 Critical Evaluation Essay: A Petition to the President of the United States The atomic bombs that were dropped on Japan in 1945 were not seen as a logical reaction to the war by everyone. Leo Szilard was a Hungarian physicist that was the first to conceive of the mechanics of the atomic bomb, and how it worked. He was fighting the use of these bombs on Japan, and trying to urge the President to reconsider the idea. Although he lost the argument overRead Morecritical evaluation essay764 Words   |  4 Pages English 102 Effectiveness in Writing September 18, 2014 Critical Evaluation Essay â€Å"Now We Can Begin† an essay by Crystal Eastman is a very powerful essay. Eastman makes the point know in her essay that an honest and true feminist no matter where she stands in the movement she will see to the woman’s fight with strength and courage and how it   matters in the future and as well as its difference in its approach for the workers fight for industrial freedom. Eastman state â€Å"In fighting for the rightRead MoreA Critical Evaluation of An Inspector Calls Essay1268 Words   |  6 PagesAn Inspector Calls Critical Evaluation - The main goal of this essay is to write about the role of Inspector Goole in the play. Other details will also going into consideration. An Inspector Calls Critical Evaluation The main goal of this essay is to write about the role of Inspector Goole in the play. Other details will also going into consideration. An Inspector Calls is a play wrote by J.B Priestly. The first scene shows a dining room of a large Edwardian house. The furniture andRead More Critical evaluation of An Inspector Calls Essay1854 Words   |  8 PagesCritical evaluation of An Inspector Calls An Inspector Calls ‘An Inspector Calls’ is a play set in the mystery/ detective thriller genre. It is set in 1912 however it was written by J.B Priestly in 1945 and staged in Moscow. As he lived through both wars he could see what had actually happened in the time the play was set. J.B Priestly uses the characters to express his views on the issue of social responsibility, morality and about class divisions with many themes including greed, regretRead MoreFunctionalism and Marxism. A Critical Evaluation Essay1135 Words   |  5 PagesFunctionalism and Marxism. A Critical Evaluation During the 18th and 19th centuries, political and industrial revolutions coupled with a philosophical movement which promoted a new scientific way of thinking (`The Enlightenment), heralded the advent of several new scientific disciplines. These social sciences attempted to explain the rapid and fundamental changes which were shattering traditional ways of life in Britain and Europe. Sociology emerged as one of these innovative areas and soughtRead MoreEssay on Critical Evaluation of the Psychodynamic Approach866 Words   |  4 PagesCritical Evaluation of the Psychodynamic Approach The psychodynamic approach, developed by Freud, emphasizes the interplay of unconscious psychological processes in determining human thought, feelings, and behaviour. The basis of this approach is that psychological factors play a major role in determining behaviour and shaping personality. Freud divided the human psyche into three; the ID, ego and superego. He said you were born with ID which was in your unconsciousRead MoreEssay about Critical Thinking: Evaluation1572 Words   |  7 PagesCritical Evaluation of an Academic Source Odetta Rodriguez Capella University Critical Evaluation of an Academic Source This paper is a summary of critical evaluation of the suitability of an article as an academic source. The title of the article is Critical Thinking: An Extended Definition. The author, Professor Ken Petress, analyzes various definitions of critical thinking and provides his definition of the concept as well. It is vitallyRead MoreCritical Evaluation Ââ€" Lamb to the Slaughter Essay738 Words   |  3 PagesA tale of the unexpected is Lamb to the Slaughter by Roald Dahl. The story has a twist in the tale ending in which a loving wife gruesomely murders her husband. Mr Patrick Maloney, a senior in the police force seemed a happy married man to his pregnant wife, Mrs. Mary Maloney. Mr Maloney comes home one night, shocking his wife with the news he is leaving her. Mrs. Maloney is in great shock, to a state that she kills her husband, with a frozen leg of lamb. In the end she gets away with it, unwittinglyRead MoreEssay On Critical Evaluation Of Control Plan1112 Words   |  5 Pages5. Critical evaluation of control strategies within plans 5.1 Surveillance and detection As influenza is a global virus, surveillance is carried out at several levels: globally by the WHO’s Global Influenza Programme (GIP); regionally, for example European surveillance; and nationally by each countrys own surveillance systems (Johnson et al., 2010; WHO, 2017c). Various other global data sharing websites, for example FluNet and FluID provide up-to-date global surveillance information, allowing national

Thursday, May 7, 2020

The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn By William Twain

In the next few chapters of Huckleberry Finn, Twain introduces a new side of the King and the Duke that you hadn’t seen before. When they arrive in a small town on the river, they go aboard a ferryboat that is heading to Orleans. They hear a young boy talking about two men that were supposed to come aboard to head to their brother’s funeral, and that they would be getting a large inheritance from the brother. So like all greedy men, the king and the duke decide to pretend to be the two uncles and head to the house of their â€Å"brother† with Huck. I think twain uses the King and the Duke to show how another part of society is influencing Huck’s moral struggles. Since Huck met the king and duke, they’ve pretended to be people that they weren’t, and Huck allowed them to do so. Then, when they decide to pretend to be the uncles of a dead stranger, Huck allows them to go through with that action as well, and it almost costs all of them. I think that Twain is trying to show how there are several different kinds of people in society, and I think he has created different characters for practically all those types of people. I think the King and the Duke represent parts of the world that think that they can do whatever they want and be whoever they want and that it won’t come with consequences. They think they are really smart and creative for pretending to be brothers of a wealthy man, but they didn’t think of the dangers of playing those roles. For one thing, both of the real unclesShow MoreRelatedThe Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn By William Twain940 Words   |  4 Pages S.Tibbs (1) Mr. Bassett ENG4U May, 2015 The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, considered to be one of America’s greatest works of literature to this date, highlights Huck’s relationships with primary and secondary characters that he meets whilst journeying down the mississippi river. Through Huck’s developmentRead MoreThe Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn By William Twain1090 Words   |  5 Pagesthe novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is regarded with much controversy by parents in America. Aside from the heavy use of the â€Å"n-word† in the book, it touches on some rather controversial themes, such as social equality, slavery and many other things. However these themes should not be frowned upon, but rather, they should be analyzed and interpreted for what they truly are; satire against racism in the South. Over the course of the book, the main character, Huckleberry Finn, embarks on anRead MoreThe Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn By William Twain1747 Words   |  7 Pages I. Setting a. b. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn begins in Huck’s hometown of St. Petersburg, Missouri. Originally, Huck lives in a clean estate with prim and proper Widow Douglas and Miss Watson who attempt to â€Å"sivilize† him. His drunken money-seeking father then abducts him and takes him to a dirty, isolated cabin across the Mississippi River. Huck escapes and floats down the river in an abandoned canoe to Jackson’s Island, lying in the middle of the Mississippi. Here, Huck finds runawayRead MoreThe Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn By William Twain1389 Words   |  6 Pages The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn show much growth in Huck’s state of mind and, consequently, conveys themes of human equality that were scarce in Twain’s time of the 1800’s. These ideas of racial equality and social criticism were heavily enforced in the novel via Huck’s growth as a person. These changes really get put into stone when Huck decides to refus e to turn in Jim by destroying the letter to Ms.Watson. Throughout Twain’s novel, Huck undergoes a drastic amount of maturing, but this momentRead MoreThe Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn By William Twain1323 Words   |  6 Pages 1. Twain must have thought Huck carried on his ideas best, and Huck is character that is quite dynamic throughout the story because everyone heavily influences him until he decides to take control of his own life. 2. The first act would be like an introduction to Huck’s life and how he lives with the widow because of his rough life. The next act would be his escape with Jim and starting his path up the river like his call to action. Huck’s â€Å"I’ll go to hell moment,† should be act three because thatRead MoreThe Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn And Its Characterization951 Words   |  4 PagesBouchey Eng. Hon. 2nd 3 March 2016 The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and its Characterization In The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain, there is a large use of characterization to develop the characters and is influenced by the time period. Mark Twain was born in 1835, and lived to see the Civil War start. This is a big influence on his writing, because his two most famous works, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. They both take place in the time beforeRead MoreMark Twain : Seeing America s Flaws1593 Words   |  7 PagesMark Twain: Seeing America’s Flaws â€Å"You don’t know about me, without you have read a book by the name of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer , but that ain’t no matter. That book was made by Mr. Mark Twain and he told the truth, mainly. There was things he stretched, but mainly he told the truth† (qtd. in Jones 237). That was the very first line in Mark Twain’s controversial book, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Samuel L. Clemens, as a young boy, grew up on the Mississippi and learned the ways of southernRead MoreHuckleberry Finn Persuasive Essay1571 Words   |  7 Pagesword and the right word is really a large matter- ‘tis the difference between the lightning bug and lightning.†(Mark Twain). Mark Twain, the author of an extraordinary yet controversial novel; The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn had a great way of capturing moments in time and bringing them to life through the use of meaningful and direct diction. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn has been a vexed novel for it s a use of the â€Å"N-word†. However, many scholars and associations have devised a â€Å"solution†Read MoreRacial Integrity Act Of 1924 And Mildred Loving1479 Words   |  6 Pagesbeen challenged. This couple, along with others, disregarded the norm of opposing interracial relationships, and above all chose love as the only thing that matters. In the play, Othello by William Shakespeare, the book Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain, and the article, â€Å"The Meaning Of Serena Williams† by Claudia Rankine, race is a major topic, and it is continuously argued in different ways. The status quo of race is challenged in these written pieces through the use of multiple literaryRead MoreResearch Paper Mark Twain1306 Words   |  6 PagesHunter - Period 2 Research Paper - Mark Twain October 26, 2012 MARK TWAIN: A REMARKABLE MAN WHO PAINTED THE WORLD â€Å"Classic - a book which people praise and dont read.† When Samuel L. Clemens (more often referred to as Mark Twain) said this, he meant it in a humorous sense, but he also wanted people to understand it’s meaning. People call books like Huck Finn and Gatsby classics, yet the idea that these books are actually read by everyone isn’t so. Twain isn’t just a classical writer because The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn By William Twain I. Setting a. b. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn begins in Huck’s hometown of St. Petersburg, Missouri. Originally, Huck lives in a clean estate with prim and proper Widow Douglas and Miss Watson who attempt to â€Å"sivilize† him. His drunken money-seeking father then abducts him and takes him to a dirty, isolated cabin across the Mississippi River. Huck escapes and floats down the river in an abandoned canoe to Jackson’s Island, lying in the middle of the Mississippi. Here, Huck finds runaway Jim. The peaceful, providing island tempts Huck and Jim to stay, but fearing that someone saw smoke from their fire, they float down the river on a raft. They intended to stop at Cairo and continue in a steamboat to the free states, but the†¦show more content†¦On the peaceful Jackson Island, he learns to relax and let time stand still. And while floating the river with Jim he becomes as untroubled as the steady Mississippi. The setting also affects both Huck and Jim’s feelings about slavery. When he first agrees to help Jim, he has only a few concerns about the legality and morality of his decision, but as they float further and further south, Huck has more and more concerns about getting caught, plausibly caused by the escalating racial tension in the south. Jim is originally very concerned about being sold south because he knows he will be treated poorly and separated from his family. As they near what they think is Cairo, Jim becomes confident and tells Huck about what he would do once he is free (248). This worries Huck so much that he decides to turn Jim in, but eventually changes his mind. Floating further down the river causes Jim more and more anxiety as they are heading deeper and deeper into the south he so dreaded. II. Point of View a. b. The point of view of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is first person. Huck narrates the book, so his perspective on two main issues, race and civility, help to enrich the story with his perspective. Like many in America in the early 19th century, the south specifically, Huck was raised in the midst of people who didn’t give the morality of slavery a second thought, as it was deeply installed in American society. So The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn By William Twain 1. Twain must have thought Huck carried on his ideas best, and Huck is character that is quite dynamic throughout the story because everyone heavily influences him until he decides to take control of his own life. 2. The first act would be like an introduction to Huck’s life and how he lives with the widow because of his rough life. The next act would be his escape with Jim and starting his path up the river like his call to action. Huck’s â€Å"I’ll go to hell moment,† should be act three because that is the moment the audience sees him no longer on the fence about everything. The fourth act would be the plan to help Jim escape because freedom is so close yet so far. Obviously the last act will involve catching up with the characters and providing closure for most. 3. The first one would be Huck abusive father because he seems to be the only one who can truly hold back. Jim is running away from slavery and needs to get his family back too. The Wilks sisters need to find their voice and independence. Huck also needs to find himself and not bend to others will. The main ones are solved. Huck’s father dies. Jim finds his freedom. The Wilks sisters stop the king and the dauphin. Huck presumably figures part of his life out and then the book is left in the open. The bigger scale problems of society approving of slavery is defiantly not resolved nor in the present day. Human trafficking exists. Tom Sawyer’s stupidity is also incurable. 4.Each setting within itself brought a newShow MoreRelatedThe Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn By William Twain940 Words   |  4 Pages S.Tibbs (1) Mr. Bassett ENG4U May, 2015 The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, considered to be one of America’s greatest works of literature to this date, highlights Huck’s relationships with primary and secondary characters that he meets whilst journeying down the mississippi river. Through Huck’s developmentRead MoreThe Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn By William Twain1090 Words   |  5 Pagesthe novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is regarded with much controversy by parents in America. Aside from the heavy use of the â€Å"n-word† in the book, it touches on some rather controversial themes, such as social equality, slavery and many other things. However these themes should not be frowned upon, but rather, they should be analyzed and interpreted for what they truly are; satire against racism in the South. Over the course of the book, the main character, Huckleberry Finn, embarks on anRead MoreThe Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn By William Twain1747 Words   |  7 Pages I. Setting a. b. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn begins in Huck’s hometown of St. Petersburg, Missouri. Originally, Huck lives in a clean estate with prim and proper Widow Douglas and Miss Watson who attempt to â€Å"sivilize† him. His drunken money-seeking father then abducts him and takes him to a dirty, isolated cabin across the Mississippi River. Huck escapes and floats down the river in an abandoned canoe to Jackson’s Island, lying in the middle of the Mississippi. Here, Huck finds runawayRead MoreThe Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn By William Twain1389 Words   |  6 Pages The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn show much growth in Huck’s state of mind and, consequently, conveys themes of human equality that were scarce in Twain’s time of the 1800’s. These ideas of racial equality and social criticism were heavily enforced in the novel via Huck’s growth as a person. These changes really get put into stone when Huck decides to refus e to turn in Jim by destroying the letter to Ms.Watson. Throughout Twain’s novel, Huck undergoes a drastic amount of maturing, but this momentRead MoreThe Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn By William Twain1949 Words   |  8 Pages In the next few chapters of Huckleberry Finn, Twain introduces a new side of the King and the Duke that you hadn’t seen before. When they arrive in a small town on the river, they go aboard a ferryboat that is heading to Orleans. They hear a young boy talking about two men that were supposed to come aboard to head to their brother’s funeral, and that they would be getting a large inheritance from the brother. So like all greedy men, the king and the duke decide to pretend to be the two uncles andRead MoreThe Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn And Its Characterization951 Words   |  4 PagesBouchey Eng. Hon. 2nd 3 March 2016 The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and its Characterization In The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain, there is a large use of characterization to develop the characters and is influenced by the time period. Mark Twain was born in 1835, and lived to see the Civil War start. This is a big influence on his writing, because his two most famous works, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. They both take place in the time beforeRead MoreMark Twain : Seeing America s Flaws1593 Words   |  7 PagesMark Twain: Seeing America’s Flaws â€Å"You don’t know about me, without you have read a book by the name of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer , but that ain’t no matter. That book was made by Mr. Mark Twain and he told the truth, mainly. There was things he stretched, but mainly he told the truth† (qtd. in Jones 237). That was the very first line in Mark Twain’s controversial book, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Samuel L. Clemens, as a young boy, grew up on the Mississippi and learned the ways of southernRead MoreHuckleberry Finn Persuasive Essay1571 Words   |  7 Pagesword and the right word is really a large matter- ‘tis the difference between the lightning bug and lightning.†(Mark Twain). Mark Twain, the author of an extraordinary yet controversial novel; The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn had a great way of capturing moments in time and bringing them to life through the use of meaningful and direct diction. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn has been a vexed novel for it s a use of the â€Å"N-word†. However, many scholars and associations have devised a â€Å"solution†Read MoreRacial Integrity Act Of 1924 And Mildred Loving1479 Words   |  6 Pagesbeen challenged. This couple, along with others, disregarded the norm of opposing interracial relationships, and above all chose love as the only thing that matters. In the play, Othello by William Shakespeare, the book Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain, and the article, â€Å"The Meaning Of Serena Williams† by Claudia Rankine, race is a major topic, and it is continuously argued in different ways. The status quo of race is challenged in these written pieces through the use of multiple literaryRead MoreResearch Paper Mark Twain1306 Words   |  6 PagesHunter - Period 2 Research Paper - Mark Twain October 26, 2012 MARK TWAIN: A REMARKABLE MAN WHO PAINTED THE WORLD â€Å"Classic - a book which people praise and dont read.† When Samuel L. Clemens (more often referred to as Mark Twain) said this, he meant it in a humorous sense, but he also wanted people to understand it’s meaning. People call books like Huck Finn and Gatsby classics, yet the idea that these books are actually read by everyone isn’t so. Twain isn’t just a classical writer because The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn By William Twain Samuel J. Tibbs S.Tibbs (1) Mr. Bassett ENG4U May, 2015 The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, considered to be one of America’s greatest works of literature to this date, highlights Huck’s relationships with primary and secondary characters that he meets whilst journeying down the mississippi river. Through Huck’s development of these relationships, his development as an individual is quite evident as novel progresses. So why is it that relationships are such a great influence to Huck? How have these relationships developed his character? To begin, we would have to look at Huck as an individual and how we are introduced to him as the novel begins. Huckleberry Finn is the protagonist and narrator of Huckleberry Finn. Huck, born and raised in St. Petersburg, Missouri is around the age of thirteen and the son of the town drunk. Huck’s personality can be defined by his hunger for self development, as he strives to educate himself unlike his friends. This aspiration of education for a boy like Huck is not normal to the society he lives in. However,Show MoreRelatedThe Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn By William Twain1090 Words   |  5 Pagesthe novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is regarded with much controversy by parents in America. Aside from the heavy use of the â€Å"n-word† in the book, it touches on some rather controversial themes, such as social equality, slavery and many other things. However these themes should not be frowned upon, but rather, they should be analyzed and interpreted for what they truly are; satire against racism in the South. Over the course of the book, the main character, Huckleberry Finn, embarks on anRead MoreThe Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn By William Twain1747 Words   |  7 Pages I. Setting a. b. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn begins in Huck’s hometown of St. Petersburg, Missouri. Originally, Huck lives in a clean estate with prim and proper Widow Douglas and Miss Watson who attempt to â€Å"sivilize† him. His drunken money-seeking father then abducts him and takes him to a dirty, isolated cabin across the Mississippi River. Huck escapes and floats down the river in an abandoned canoe to Jackson’s Island, lying in the middle of the Mississippi. Here, Huck finds runawayRead MoreThe Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn By William Twain1389 Words   |  6 Pages The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn show much growth in Huck’s state of mind and, consequently, conveys themes of human equality that were scarce in Twain’s time of the 1800’s. These ideas of racial equality and social criticism were heavily enforced in the novel via Huck’s growth as a person. These changes really get put into stone when Huck decides to refus e to turn in Jim by destroying the letter to Ms.Watson. Throughout Twain’s novel, Huck undergoes a drastic amount of maturing, but this momentRead MoreThe Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn By William Twain1323 Words   |  6 Pages 1. Twain must have thought Huck carried on his ideas best, and Huck is character that is quite dynamic throughout the story because everyone heavily influences him until he decides to take control of his own life. 2. The first act would be like an introduction to Huck’s life and how he lives with the widow because of his rough life. The next act would be his escape with Jim and starting his path up the river like his call to action. Huck’s â€Å"I’ll go to hell moment,† should be act three because thatRead MoreThe Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn By William Twain1949 Words   |  8 Pages In the next few chapters of Huckleberry Finn, Twain introduces a new side of the King and the Duke that you hadn’t seen before. When they arrive in a small town on the river, they go aboard a ferryboat that is heading to Orleans. They hear a young boy talking about two men that were supposed to come aboard to head to their brother’s funeral, and that they would be getting a large inheritance from the brother. So like all greedy men, the king and the duke decide to pretend to be the two uncles andRead MoreThe Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn And Its Characterization951 Words   |  4 PagesBouchey Eng. Hon. 2nd 3 March 2016 The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and its Characterization In The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain, there is a large use of characterization to develop the characters and is influenced by the time period. Mark Twain was born in 1835, and lived to see the Civil War start. This is a big influence on his writing, because his two most famous works, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. They both take place in the time beforeRead MoreMark Twain : Seeing America s Flaws1593 Words   |  7 PagesMark Twain: Seeing America’s Flaws â€Å"You don’t know about me, without you have read a book by the name of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer , but that ain’t no matter. That book was made by Mr. Mark Twain and he told the truth, mainly. There was things he stretched, but mainly he told the truth† (qtd. in Jones 237). That was the very first line in Mark Twain’s controversial book, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Samuel L. Clemens, as a young boy, grew up on the Mississippi and learned the ways of southernRead MoreHuckleberry Finn Persuasive Essay1571 Words   |  7 Pagesword and the right word is really a large matter- ‘tis the difference between the lightning bug and lightning.†(Mark Twain). Mark Twain, the author of an extraordinary yet controversial novel; The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn had a great way of capturing moments in time and bringing them to life through the use of meaningful and direct diction. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn has been a vexed novel for it s a use of the â€Å"N-word†. However, many scholars and associations have devised a â€Å"solution†Read MoreRacial Integrity Act Of 1924 And Mildred Loving1479 Words   |  6 Pagesbeen challenged. This couple, along with others, disregarded the norm of opposing interracial relationships, and above all chose love as the only thing that matters. In the play, Othello by William Shakespeare, the book Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain, and the article, â€Å"The Meaning Of Serena Williams† by Claudia Rankine, race is a major topic, and it is continuously argued in different ways. The status quo of race is challenged in these written pieces through the use of multiple literaryRead MoreResearch Paper Mark Twain1306 Words   |  6 PagesHunter - Period 2 Research Paper - Mark Twain October 26, 2012 MARK TWAIN: A REMARKABLE MAN WHO PAINTED THE WORLD â€Å"Classic - a book which people praise and dont read.† When Samuel L. Clemens (more often referred to as Mark Twain) said this, he meant it in a humorous sense, but he also wanted people to understand it’s meaning. People call books like Huck Finn and Gatsby classics, yet the idea that these books are actually read by everyone isn’t so. Twain isn’t just a classical writer because

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Pediatric Palliative Care Free Essays

Pediatric Palliative Care Ana M. Gehan Thomas Edison State College Pediatric Palliative Care In modern society, children are expected to outlive their parents. However, for children living with life threatening illnesses, palliative care is an approach to care that enhances quality of life for both the child and the grieving parents. We will write a custom essay sample on Pediatric Palliative Care or any similar topic only for you Order Now In the article, â€Å"Pediatric Palliative Care: The Time is Now! † the authors stress how important it is to start and/or continue pediatric palliative care programs. Worldwide, an estimated 7 million children and their families could benefit from hospice care (Rushton, January-February 2002, p. 7). In the United States alone, 1 million children are very serious ill (Rushton, January-February 2002, p. 57). Pediatric palliative care has become an increasing discussion in the health care world. Palliative care was first introduced in 1990 by the World Health Organization (WHO) and is currently defined as â€Å"an approach to care which improves quality of life of patients and their families facing life-threatening illness through prevention, assessment and treatment of pain and other physical, psychological, and spiritual problems â€Å"(Morgan, March-April, p. 7). Pediatric palliative care is an area of the patient care that can be one of the most emotionally challenging ar eas of practice. In the article, â€Å"Caring for Dying Children: Assessing the Needs of the Pediatric Palliative Care Nurse† the author outlines how stressful the job of taking care of a dying child can be on the nurse. Health care workers may experience emotions such as helplessness, anger, sadness, and anxiety while providing care to dying children (Morgan, March-April, p. 86). These emotions may quickly lead to â€Å"nurse burnout† and increase nurse burnout in hospital settings. It is not uncommon for health care workers to perceive the death of a child as a â€Å"triple† failure: first, because they did not have the means, skills or abilities to save a life; second, because in their social role as adults, they were unable to protect the child from harm; and, third, because they â€Å"betrayed† parents who trusted them with the most valuable being in their life (Morgan, March-April, p. 87). The nurse’s role in caring and supporting children and their families require special coping skills which are essential to providing the most positive outcome for all that are involved in the palliative process. The aim of pediatric palliative care is to keep the child comfortable while supporting the parents in caring for their child according to their wishes and beliefs. From the diagnosis, parents are already grieving the loss of their child. Grieving not only affects the family but has a huge emotional impact on health care providers as well. When a child’s life ends, families need intense and long-term psychosocial and bereavement services (Rushton, January-February 2002, p. 57). Psychosocial and bereavement resources and support for health care professionals who care for these children are virtually nonexistent or minimally supported in the current cost constrained health care environment (Rushton, January-February 2002, p. 57). The medical world and Congress have taken an important first step to support the need for pediatric palliative care services. In 1999, CHI successfully advocated for bipartisan congressional appropriations for demonstration model program to address the unique needs of children with life threatening conditions (Rushton, January-February 2002, p. 59). There is so much to that nursing has to do in the future to make sure that pediatric palliative is out there in every hospital, institute and every setting that a child is at. We all must increase the awareness of pediatric palliative care programs and the special needs of the nurses who care for these dying children. A child’s death may seem like a long, scary pathway. Nurses have the power to create a brighter journey for these patients and their families, as well as for themselves. References Morgan, D. (March-April). Caring for Dying Children: Assessing the Needs of the Pediatric Palliative Care Nurse. Pediatric Nursing, 35(2), 86-90. Rushton, C. H. (January-February 2002). Pediatric Palliative Care: The Time is Now! Pediatric Nursing, 28(1), 57-70. How to cite Pediatric Palliative Care, Papers

Monday, April 27, 2020

The Tom Robinson trial in To Kill a Mockingbird parallels The Scottsboro trials Essay Example

The Tom Robinson trial in To Kill a Mockingbird parallels The Scottsboro trials Paper English 9 GT 12 December 2011 Thesis Statement: The Tom Robinson trial in To Kill a Mockingbird parallels the Scottsboro trials through similar events, verdicts, and testimonies. I. Scottsboro Trials A. Timeline Events 1. April 6th 1931- the trial of nine men begin. 2. April 9th 1933- Haywood Patterson was again found guilty for rape. 3. April 9th 1933- Patterson found guilty and sentenced to death. 4. 1940s- all but 1 escape or are paroled. 5. June 9th 1950- the last Scottsboro boy is released from prison. B. Testimony 1. Victoria Price and Ruby Bates claimed that the 9 men from from Scottsboro allegedly attacked them on a train heading to Memphis. 2. Only hours after the attack Dr. R. R Bridges examined the girls and saw there were no Cuts, or Bruises, he reported the girls were under no stress and were calm. C. Verdict- nine young black men were arrested and found guilty of raping two white women on train in Alabama. II. Tom Robinson Trial A. Verdict- Tom Robinson was found guilty for raping Mayella Ewell B. Testimony 1. Mayella Ewell claimed that Tom Robinson raped her, after she asked him to work on furniture in the Ewells home. 2. Tom Robinson claimed that he did fix furniture for Mayella, but packed up and left after he finished working. C. Parallels 1. The Tom Robinson case, and the Scottsboro case are extremely similar because in each case it has been obvious that the court system has been discriminative against blacks and chose the unjust way to solve a court case. 2. Both cases are also about African Americans raping whites. 3. Both cases, had white lawyers defending blacks We will write a custom essay sample on The Tom Robinson trial in To Kill a Mockingbird parallels The Scottsboro trials specifically for you for only $16.38 $13.9/page Order now We will write a custom essay sample on The Tom Robinson trial in To Kill a Mockingbird parallels The Scottsboro trials specifically for you FOR ONLY $16.38 $13.9/page Hire Writer We will write a custom essay sample on The Tom Robinson trial in To Kill a Mockingbird parallels The Scottsboro trials specifically for you FOR ONLY $16.38 $13.9/page Hire Writer

Thursday, March 19, 2020

THE SEA AROUND US essays

THE SEA AROUND US essays This book is about information on how they think the oceans were formed. There are several theories on how the ocean was started. One of the theories is that a chunk of the earth was knocked out and made the Pacific Ocean. Another is that when the world was formed the oceans were just there after the worlds temperature cold down. Another topic in the book is that the moon is the earths child. They think that while the earth was being form the moon came in to play after a comet hit the earth. Than it cause the moon to go into our atmosphere and made it that go in orbits of the earth. That is what makes waves in the oceans. This is what the first chapter basically is talking about. The one weird thing about this book is that they say the moon can fit perfectly in the area of the Pacific Ocean. They also took rock from one side of the moon and rock from the bottom of the ocean, and they compared them together. They found out that both of the rocks are the same. That is why they thing the moon and the Pacific Ocean are the same and the missing piece in the ocean is actually the moon in space. If the moon is apart of the earth how comes the moon and the Pacific Ocean doesnt have a thin granite layer instead of the same materials of the inner layer. The other topics that are opened in the book are about how the if the moon is apart of the earth how comes the moons mass is not the same as the earths. The moons mass is between 3.3 and 5.5. That is what is confusing some of the scientist that is doing research on the planet and the oceans. Also another topic in the book is how they think as the world changed over the years they ocean change with it and the pacific oceans missing piece was pushed out when the land was moving around to different parts of the world. The second reason is that when the earth was first made it was a really volcano place that they also thing that a super volcan ...

Monday, March 2, 2020

Antebellum Homes - Architecture of Time and Place

Antebellum Homes - Architecture of Time and Place Antebellum homes refer to the large, elegant mansions - usually plantation homes - built in the American South during the 30 years or so before the American Civil War (1861-1865). Antebellum means before war in Latin. Antebellum is not a particular house style or architecture. Rather, it is a time and place in history - a period in American history that triggers great emotions even today. Antebellum Time and Place The features we associate with antebellum architecture were introduced to the American South by Anglo-Americans, outliers who moved into the area after the 1803 Louisiana Purchase and during a wave of immigration from Europe. Southern architecture had been characterized by whoever lived on the land - the Spanish, the French, Creole, Native Americans - but this new wave of entrepreneurs began to dominate not only the economy, but also the architecture in the first half of the 19th century. Great numbers of Europeans seeking economic opportunities emigrated to America after Napoleans defeat and the end of the War of 1812. These immigrants became the merchants and planters of goods to trade, including tobacco, cotton, sugar, and indigo.  The great plantations of Americas south flourished, largely on the back of a slave labor force. Antebellum architecture is so intertwined with the memory of American slavery that many people believe these buildings are not worth preserving or, even, should be destroyed. Stanton Hall, for example, was built in 1859 by  Frederick Stanton, born in  County Antrim, Northern Ireland. Stanton settled in  Natchez, Mississippi to become a wealthy cotton merchant. The plantation homes of the south, like Stanton Hall built before Americas Civil War, expressed wealth and the grand revival architectural styles of the day. Typical Characteristics of Antebellum Houses Most antebellum homes are in the Greek Revival or Classical Revival, and sometimes French Colonial and Federal style - grand, symmetrical, and boxy, with center entrances in the front and rear, balconies, and columns or pillars. This opulent style of architecture was popular throughout the U.S. in the first half of the 19th century. Architectural details include hipped or gabled roof; symmetrical faà §ade; evenly-spaced windows; Greek-type pillars and columns; elaborate friezes; balconies and covered porches; central entryway with a grand staircase; formal ballroom; and often a cupola. Examples of Antebellum Architecture The term antebellum stirs thoughts of Tara, the palatial plantation home featured in in the book and movie Gone with the Wind. From grand, pillared Greek Revival mansions to stately Federal style estates, Americas antebellum-era architecture reflects the power and idealism of wealthy landowners in the American South, prior to the Civil War. Plantation homes continue to rival Gilded Age mansions as Americas grand estates. A few examples of antebellum homes include Oak Alley Plantation in Vacherie, Louisiana; Belle Meade Plantation in Nashville, Tennessee; Long Branch Estate in Millwood, Virginia; and Longwood estate in Natchez, Mississippi. Much has been written and photographed of the homes of this time period. This architecture of time and place has served its original purpose, and the question now for these buildings is, Whats next? Many of these homes were ruined during the Civil War - and later by Hurricane Katrina along the Gulf Coast. After the Civil War, private schools often consumed the properties. Today, many are tourist destinations and some have become part of the hospitality industry. The question of preservation is ever-present for this type of architecture. But, should this part of Americas past be saved? Boone Hall Plantation near Charleston, South Carolina, was an established plantation even before the American Revolution - in the 1600s, the Boone family became original settlers of the South Carolina colony. Today the buildings on the grounds of this tourist destination have been largely rebuilt, with an attitude of integration of the lives of all, including a slave history presentation and a Black History in America exhibit. In addition to being a working farm, Boone Hall Plantation exposes the public to a time and place in American history. After Katrina: Lost Architecture in Mississippi New Orleans was not the only area damaged by Hurricane Katrina in 2005. The storm may have made landfall in Louisiana, but its path ripped straight through the length of the state of Mississippi. Millions of trees were uprooted, snapped or severely damaged, reported the National Weather Service from Jackson. It was the fallen trees that caused just about all of the structural damage and downed power lines across this region. Hundreds of trees fell onto homes causing minor to major damage. Its impossible to calculate the full extent of Hurricane Katrinas damages. In addition to the loss of lives, homes, and jobs, towns along Americas Gulf Coast lost some of their most valuable cultural resources. As residents began to clean up the rubble, historians and museum curators began to catalog the destruction. One example is Beauvoir, a raised cottage built shortly before the Civil War in 1851. It became the final home for Confederate leader Jefferson Davis. The porch and columns were destroyed by Hurricane Katrina, but the Presidential archives remained safe on the second floor. Other buildings in Mississippi were not so lucky, including these destroyed by the hurricane: The  Robinson-Maloney-Dantzler HouseBuilt in Biloxi c. 1849 by English immigrant J.G. Robinson, a wealthy cotton planter, this elegant, columned home had just been refurbished and was about to open as a Mardi Gras Museum. The Tullis Toledano ManorConstructed in 1856 by cotton broker Christoval Sebastian Toledano, the Biloxi mansion was a stately Greek Revival home with massive brick columns. Grass LawnAlso known as Milner House, this 1836 Antebellum mansion in Gulfport, Mississippi was the summer home of  Dr. Hiram Alexander Roberts, a medical doctor and sugar planter. The home was destroyed in 2005 by Hurricane Katrina, but in 2012 a replica was built on the same footprint. The controversial project is reported well by Jay Pridmore in Rebuilding a Historic Mississippi Plantation. Preservation of National Historic Sites Saving great architecture played second fiddle to saving lives and public safety concerns during and after Hurricane Katrina. Cleanup efforts began immediately and often without adhering to the National Historic Preservation Act.  So much damage was done by Katrina that there was a great need to clean up the debris, but little time to enter into the proper consultation required by the National Historic Preservation Act,† said Ken P’Pool of the Historic Preservation Division, Mississippi Department of Archives and History. A similar circumstance happened in New York City after the terrorist attacks of 9/11/01, when clean-up and rebuilding was mandated to work within what had become a national historic site. In 2015, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) completed a database of properties and archaeological sites, reviewed thousands of recovery projects and grant applications, and erected cast aluminum historic markers commemorating 29 of the hundreds of lost properties. Sources The Story of Stanton Hall, stantonhall.com/stanton-hall.php [accessed July 21, 2016]A Look Back at Hurricane Katrina, National Weather Service Jackson, MS Weather Forecast OfficeNational Register of Historic Places Continuation Sheet, NPS Form 10-900-a Prepared by William M. Gatlin, Architectural Historian, August 2008 (PDF)FEMA Helps Mississippi Preserve Important Architectural Properties, DR-1604-MS NR 757, August 19, 2015 [accessed August 23, 2015]